Post Tagged with: "Active learning"

Taking Modern Pedogogy into the Large Classroom

Marc Sprague-Piercy, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry The current thinking in pedagogy is moving away from the traditional classroom model. In the traditional classroom for large classes of undergraduates there is a clear plan. The students are given a series of readings that are to be done before or after the class, there are 3 or so hours of lecture a week, and then there are two to three […]

Read More

Adding the EPIC to Education

Emily M. Slonecker, M.A, Department of Psychological Science What is your first thought when you hear the word “icebreaker”? If your first thought is the sound of 200 students groaning in unison, you just might be an educator. There is growing body of evidence to suggest that active learning techniques, like the ever-dreaded icebreaker, are highly beneficial when incorporated into higher education classrooms (Wieman, 2014). Yet, many students remain resistant to […]

Read More

Rethinking the Physics Classroom: 4 Tools to Consider

Francisco J. Mercado, Department of Physics & Astronomy When we think about a physics classroom, more often than not, the picture that comes to mind is an ‘all-knowing’ professor standing at the front of a classroom writing on a blackboard while some of the students behind them are vigorously taking notes struggling to keep up. Others are attempting to complete the difficult problem set that they have to turn in by […]

Read More

Increasing Student Autonomy and Engagement in Biology Education at the Undergraduate and Graduate Level

 Lianna Fung, Developmental and Cell Biology A typical traditional biology course at the undergraduate level is primarily lecture and a few exams. Lecture time is often only broken up periodically by a few iClicker questions or a few brave students who dare to ask questions. Further down the educational line, a similar environment occurs in graduate courses, called journal clubs, where students are assigned papers and present them to a […]

Read More

Improving Student Engagement

Jonathan Ware, Department of Sociology In my Social Psychology class, we had just finished an in-class activity where my students were applying theories of power and how group structures play a role in interpersonal power relations. My students were segmented into groups of three and four and spent roughly 15 minutes completing the activity and were discussing among their groups. When we came back together as a class, I asked […]

Read More

Using Science to Inform Evidence-Based Practices – The Role of Flipped Classrooms

Emily Kan, Department of Psychological Science At universities across the world, student researchers work for hours to uncover new scientific discoveries. After months and years of hard work, they finally see the fruits of their labor – successfully publishing an article in a top-tier journal. Yet, publishing in a scientific journal is not the ultimate goal. At least, it shouldn’t be. Has our research impacted practice or policy? Is our […]

Read More

Overcoming Anxieties of Learning Quantitative Methodology and Gaining the Confidence to Teach it

Martín Jacinto, Department of Sociology In a farewell piece as editor of Teaching Sociology, Stephen Sweet writes that teaching sociologically, “requires understanding teaching as a social act that is conducive to study, vigilante empathy to understand the lifeworlds of students, and building our own character as we attempt to build the character of students” (2019: 257). Indeed, it the mission of professors of sociology to teach sociological frameworks that elucidate […]

Read More

The Benefits of Multirole In-Class Critiques for Students

Ivy Guild, MFA, Department of Art Typically used in design or art-oriented courses, a critique is a collaborative feedback technique for providing students with oral formative and summative assessments from their instructor and peers. In most educational settings, written formative and summative assessments provide the majority of the feedback that students and instructors receive. These assessments vary in form, but are typically restricted to experiences between the student and instructor, […]

Read More

Incorporation of Collaborative Learning in Classroom Teaching

Jawad Fayaz, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering For centuries, classroom teaching has been mainly based on the conventional approach of lecturing by faculty members and learning being evaluated by traditional examinations. This approach does not lead to the development of highly required skills such as critical thinking, communication, and leadership. Recent research demonstrates that classroom discussion, collaborative learning/teaching, and team experiences are usually required to enhance these skills. Nevertheless, the […]

Read More

Instructing Mathematics to Students With Wide Ranges in Prior Knowledge

David Clausen, Department of Mathematics When teaching introductory college math courses, one finds a wide variety of students. In a calculus class, you might have people majoring in mathematics who need a conceptual understanding of “why” as well as facility with computations. They might be sitting next to students in STEM fields for which it is a prerequisite who will be more focused on using the material solve problems from […]

Read More