Post Tagged with: "Group work"

How to Evaluate Individual Work Within a Group Project; Group-Individual Projects May Help!

Negin Sattari, Department of Cognitive Sciences Group Versus Individual Project Often students’ faces announce dissatisfaction when a group project is proposed during the first session of the class as a part of the final examination. The complaints are mainly coming from hard-working students who doubt that other group members work as hard as they do. This guard against group projects is even more stressed among college students who may not […]

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Making Group Work Work: Designing Positive Group Work Experiences for Students

Deanna Myers, Department of Chemistry Group work. Just hearing the phrase brings up feelings of dread in many students. I remember feeling this way when I entered an upper-division chemistry course at my undergraduate institution. When the professors told us we would be assigned lab groups, with whom we would be doing projects and turning in group reports, I was filled with trepidation. But over the course of the quarter, […]

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Rethinking the Physics Classroom: 4 Tools to Consider

Francisco J. Mercado, Department of Physics & Astronomy When we think about a physics classroom, more often than not, the picture that comes to mind is an ‘all-knowing’ professor standing at the front of a classroom writing on a blackboard while some of the students behind them are vigorously taking notes struggling to keep up. Others are attempting to complete the difficult problem set that they have to turn in by […]

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Implementing Flipped Classrooms into Law School Pedagogy

Conor Gómez, School of Law Welcome to Law School. All your hard work wooing professors to write encouraging letters of recommendation and studying for a standardized test that supposedly predicts performance in the first year of law school is finally over. Now the really hard work begins. For those of you like me (who did not participate in Greek life during undergrad), law school’s hazing tactics to weed students out […]

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Phone-a-Friend: Tips for Designing Meaningful Collaborative Exams

Jaclyn Beck, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior Wait a minute. You want to test how much your students learned! Why would you want to give them a group exam? Perhaps a shift in perspective can answer that: Aside from scoring a student’s performance, exams themselves can be used as additional learning opportunities. Collaborative activities can increase student learning and performance in many different settings (Johnson and Johnson 2009, Efu 2019, […]

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Learning through Writing Assignments

Jinna Kim, Department of Sociology Instructors often use writing assignments to assess students’ learning. There are many ways that writing assignments can be a form of active learning, especially when considering it as a writing process. Below are suggestions for implementing effective writing assignments that will enhance student learning. Writing Workshops Devote a class session to discuss assignment expectations and guidelines (ex. formatting, citations). Instructors can also connect with librarians […]

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Using Science to Inform Evidence-Based Practices – The Role of Flipped Classrooms

Emily Kan, Department of Psychological Science At universities across the world, student researchers work for hours to uncover new scientific discoveries. After months and years of hard work, they finally see the fruits of their labor – successfully publishing an article in a top-tier journal. Yet, publishing in a scientific journal is not the ultimate goal. At least, it shouldn’t be. Has our research impacted practice or policy? Is our […]

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Incorporation of Collaborative Learning in Classroom Teaching

Jawad Fayaz, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering For centuries, classroom teaching has been mainly based on the conventional approach of lecturing by faculty members and learning being evaluated by traditional examinations. This approach does not lead to the development of highly required skills such as critical thinking, communication, and leadership. Recent research demonstrates that classroom discussion, collaborative learning/teaching, and team experiences are usually required to enhance these skills. Nevertheless, the […]

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Two Misconceptions about Group Work/Collaborative Learning

Matthew Cheung, Department of Mathematics There are two misconceptions about group work and collaborative learning that need to be addressed. Group Work and Collaborative Learning May Not Always be Ideal As a teaching assistant at UC Irvine, I question other teaching assistants why they implement group work or collaborative learning. I hear answers such as:  “Group work gets the students active. Active learning is good.” If the reason for implementing […]

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The Case for Meta-Integration Collaborative Activities (MICAs)

Mayan K. Castro, M.A., Department of Psychological Science What is a MICA? This is a call for a new type of assignment: a Meta-Integration Collaborative Activity (MICA). The goal of a MICA is to present an explicit opportunity for students to connect the dots among the disparate ideas introduced across their various courses and to encourage students to reflect on how those connections fit into the bigger picture of their […]

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