Post Tagged with: "Exams"

Promoting Student Agency and Learning Through Specifications Grading

Chris Woods, Department of Chemistry The current grading paradigm has been seldom challenged for a long time, and for many, leaves much to be desired. The assignment of grades can be a cause of trepidation for many educators. Many students feel that they do not earn a grade as much as it is ‘given’ based on subjective criteria. Students feel encouraged to prioritize points and partial credit over subject mastery, […]

Read More

Taking Modern Pedogogy into the Large Classroom

Marc Sprague-Piercy, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry The current thinking in pedagogy is moving away from the traditional classroom model. In the traditional classroom for large classes of undergraduates there is a clear plan. The students are given a series of readings that are to be done before or after the class, there are 3 or so hours of lecture a week, and then there are two to three […]

Read More

Improving Critical Thinking Skills in College Students

Erica M. Leung, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering “People grow best where they continuously experience an ingenious blend of support and challenge.” -Robert Kegan1 Cognitive Development of College Students Most students enter college with the notion that there are right and wrong answers and the road to knowledge is straightforward.2 Students undergo significant cognitive growth during college, shifting their view of knowledge from objective duality to subjective multiplicity (i.e. […]

Read More

Implementing Flipped Classrooms into Law School Pedagogy

Conor Gómez, School of Law Welcome to Law School. All your hard work wooing professors to write encouraging letters of recommendation and studying for a standardized test that supposedly predicts performance in the first year of law school is finally over. Now the really hard work begins. For those of you like me (who did not participate in Greek life during undergrad), law school’s hazing tactics to weed students out […]

Read More

Increasing Student Autonomy and Engagement in Biology Education at the Undergraduate and Graduate Level

 Lianna Fung, Developmental and Cell Biology A typical traditional biology course at the undergraduate level is primarily lecture and a few exams. Lecture time is often only broken up periodically by a few iClicker questions or a few brave students who dare to ask questions. Further down the educational line, a similar environment occurs in graduate courses, called journal clubs, where students are assigned papers and present them to a […]

Read More

Accommodating the Type 1 Diabetic Student

Morgan Coburn, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior *Please consult with your school’s unique medical support protocol for information on your institution guidelines for treating Type 1 Diabetes. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an incurable autoimmune disease where the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas are attacked. The cells of your body use insulin as a meal ticket, allowing sugar to enter. Without insulin, sugar cannot enter […]

Read More

Phone-a-Friend: Tips for Designing Meaningful Collaborative Exams

Jaclyn Beck, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior Wait a minute. You want to test how much your students learned! Why would you want to give them a group exam? Perhaps a shift in perspective can answer that: Aside from scoring a student’s performance, exams themselves can be used as additional learning opportunities. Collaborative activities can increase student learning and performance in many different settings (Johnson and Johnson 2009, Efu 2019, […]

Read More

Can You Explain That 3 More Times? Advice for Universal Instruction

Daniel J. Ruiz, Department of Earth System Science After asking someone to repeat themselves multiple times and still not hear what they’ve said on the 3rd iteration, I’m the type to give up, smile and nod, and be overcome with embarrassment of the whole exchange. Too often do our students feel this way after asking their peers, TAs, and instructors questions only to get the same explanation and sheepishly give […]

Read More

Do Scantron Tests on College Campuses Increase Summative Assessment Measurement Error?

Samantha Garcia, MPH, CHES, Program in Public Health Summative assessments are assessments that provide evidence of students’ cumulative knowledge learned throughout a course.1 While it is essential for students to master course content and build a foundation in that topic area, summative assessments given in the form of a Scantron-based standardized exams may not adequately measure the intended objective. What if our assessments have measurement error? What if the measurement […]

Read More

Using Exams as a Learning Experience

Christian Glaser, PhD, Department of Physics and Astronomy Traditionally, exams test students’ knowledge at a certain point in time. They are not intended for the students to learn anything but to show what they know. But what if exams can be turned into a valuable learning experience? New research show that this is possible with little additional work for the instructors [1]. The time before the exams is the busiest […]

Read More