Post Tagged with: "Course design"

Lilly Conference on Teaching for Active and Engaged Learning – San Diego, 2020

Katie Cox, Department of Anthropology In late February 2020 – just before the COVID-19 pandemic prompted the shutdown of university campuses and shelter-in-place orders around the world – I had the opportunity to attend a Lilly Conference in San Diego. The Lilly Conference Series brings together university educators and administrators to present on the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), with a focus on evidence-based teaching practices and active learning […]

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Promoting Student Agency and Learning Through Specifications Grading

Chris Woods, Department of Chemistry The current grading paradigm has been seldom challenged for a long time, and for many, leaves much to be desired. The assignment of grades can be a cause of trepidation for many educators. Many students feel that they do not earn a grade as much as it is ‘given’ based on subjective criteria. Students feel encouraged to prioritize points and partial credit over subject mastery, […]

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Preparing the Environmental Professionals of the Future: Backwards Design in Environmental Studies

Paroma Wagle, Department of Urban Planning and Public Policy Learning about sustainability, climate change, and environmental justice, the ‘wicked problems’ of the environment, is absolutely crucial for students, as they will not only go on maybe select careers in environment and policy fields, but also are going to be decision-makers in their own fields and consumers. Our day-to-day decisions as well as broader policies are closely connected to environmental concerns. […]

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Implementing Flipped Classrooms into Law School Pedagogy

Conor Gómez, School of Law Welcome to Law School. All your hard work wooing professors to write encouraging letters of recommendation and studying for a standardized test that supposedly predicts performance in the first year of law school is finally over. Now the really hard work begins. For those of you like me (who did not participate in Greek life during undergrad), law school’s hazing tactics to weed students out […]

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Increasing Student Autonomy and Engagement in Biology Education at the Undergraduate and Graduate Level

 Lianna Fung, Developmental and Cell Biology A typical traditional biology course at the undergraduate level is primarily lecture and a few exams. Lecture time is often only broken up periodically by a few iClicker questions or a few brave students who dare to ask questions. Further down the educational line, a similar environment occurs in graduate courses, called journal clubs, where students are assigned papers and present them to a […]

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Accommodating the Type 1 Diabetic Student

Morgan Coburn, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior *Please consult with your school’s unique medical support protocol for information on your institution guidelines for treating Type 1 Diabetes. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an incurable autoimmune disease where the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas are attacked. The cells of your body use insulin as a meal ticket, allowing sugar to enter. Without insulin, sugar cannot enter […]

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Promoting Equity and Humanizing Online Courses

Maricela Bañuelos, School of Education Historically, online learning was intended to increase underserved students’ access to educational opportunities. These students include students who are financially disadvantaged, English language learners, or disabled, or who come from rural areas (Campbell & Storo, 1996). While online courses may have expanded educational access to historically marginalized students, studies have found that students from marginalized groups are less likely to succeed in online courses (Pascansky-Brock et […]

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Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) 2020 Conference

Matthew Mahavongtrakul, PhD, Division of Teaching Excellence and Innovation I attended the AAC&U 2020 conference this January in Washington, DC, which focused on three topics: Inclusive education using equitable, innovative, and cost-effective models. Public trust in higher education given rising tuition costs Pathways to student success across disciplines at 2- and 4-year institutions In this post, I highlight what I took away from the conference, focusing on faculty development, undergraduate […]

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Three Tips for Promoting Student Motivation

Yangyang Liu, School of Education Students play an active role in their own learning. However, as an instructor, you may have noticed that some students are more motivated than others in your classroom. According to educational research, optimal learning happens when individuals are intrinsically motivated (Black & Deci, 2000). You can motivate your students by promoting their sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Granting Autonomy Teaching is a structured human […]

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Using Science to Inform Evidence-Based Practices – The Role of Flipped Classrooms

Emily Kan, Department of Psychological Science At universities across the world, student researchers work for hours to uncover new scientific discoveries. After months and years of hard work, they finally see the fruits of their labor – successfully publishing an article in a top-tier journal. Yet, publishing in a scientific journal is not the ultimate goal. At least, it shouldn’t be. Has our research impacted practice or policy? Is our […]

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