Post Tagged with: "Assessment"

Promoting Student Agency and Learning Through Specifications Grading

Chris Woods, Department of Chemistry The current grading paradigm has been seldom challenged for a long time, and for many, leaves much to be desired. The assignment of grades can be a cause of trepidation for many educators. Many students feel that they do not earn a grade as much as it is ‘given’ based on subjective criteria. Students feel encouraged to prioritize points and partial credit over subject mastery, […]

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Preparing the Environmental Professionals of the Future: Backwards Design in Environmental Studies

Paroma Wagle, Department of Urban Planning and Public Policy Learning about sustainability, climate change, and environmental justice, the ‘wicked problems’ of the environment, is absolutely crucial for students, as they will not only go on maybe select careers in environment and policy fields, but also are going to be decision-makers in their own fields and consumers. Our day-to-day decisions as well as broader policies are closely connected to environmental concerns. […]

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Taking Modern Pedogogy into the Large Classroom

Marc Sprague-Piercy, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry The current thinking in pedagogy is moving away from the traditional classroom model. In the traditional classroom for large classes of undergraduates there is a clear plan. The students are given a series of readings that are to be done before or after the class, there are 3 or so hours of lecture a week, and then there are two to three […]

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Improving Critical Thinking Skills in College Students

Erica M. Leung, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering “People grow best where they continuously experience an ingenious blend of support and challenge.” -Robert Kegan1 Cognitive Development of College Students Most students enter college with the notion that there are right and wrong answers and the road to knowledge is straightforward.2 Students undergo significant cognitive growth during college, shifting their view of knowledge from objective duality to subjective multiplicity (i.e. […]

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Implementing Flipped Classrooms into Law School Pedagogy

Conor Gómez, School of Law Welcome to Law School. All your hard work wooing professors to write encouraging letters of recommendation and studying for a standardized test that supposedly predicts performance in the first year of law school is finally over. Now the really hard work begins. For those of you like me (who did not participate in Greek life during undergrad), law school’s hazing tactics to weed students out […]

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Increasing Student Autonomy and Engagement in Biology Education at the Undergraduate and Graduate Level

 Lianna Fung, Developmental and Cell Biology A typical traditional biology course at the undergraduate level is primarily lecture and a few exams. Lecture time is often only broken up periodically by a few iClicker questions or a few brave students who dare to ask questions. Further down the educational line, a similar environment occurs in graduate courses, called journal clubs, where students are assigned papers and present them to a […]

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Accommodating the Type 1 Diabetic Student

Morgan Coburn, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior *Please consult with your school’s unique medical support protocol for information on your institution guidelines for treating Type 1 Diabetes. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an incurable autoimmune disease where the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas are attacked. The cells of your body use insulin as a meal ticket, allowing sugar to enter. Without insulin, sugar cannot enter […]

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Phone-a-Friend: Tips for Designing Meaningful Collaborative Exams

Jaclyn Beck, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior Wait a minute. You want to test how much your students learned! Why would you want to give them a group exam? Perhaps a shift in perspective can answer that: Aside from scoring a student’s performance, exams themselves can be used as additional learning opportunities. Collaborative activities can increase student learning and performance in many different settings (Johnson and Johnson 2009, Efu 2019, […]

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Improving Student Engagement

Jonathan Ware, Department of Sociology In my Social Psychology class, we had just finished an in-class activity where my students were applying theories of power and how group structures play a role in interpersonal power relations. My students were segmented into groups of three and four and spent roughly 15 minutes completing the activity and were discussing among their groups. When we came back together as a class, I asked […]

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Learning through Writing Assignments

Jinna Kim, Department of Sociology Instructors often use writing assignments to assess students’ learning. There are many ways that writing assignments can be a form of active learning, especially when considering it as a writing process. Below are suggestions for implementing effective writing assignments that will enhance student learning. Writing Workshops Devote a class session to discuss assignment expectations and guidelines (ex. formatting, citations). Instructors can also connect with librarians […]

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